Comments

Nurses are copping the blame for waiting time in emergency rooms when clearly they are here to help. The government clearly needs to understand that you need to help others before you help  yourself.

It ridiculous to expect nurses in ED to give adequate care to more than 3 patients considering the turnover of patients let alone the acuity, behavioural aspects.

Absolutely we need to support nurses. They are at the coal face, especially in ED and intensive care. They have to deal with a swathe of human tragedy and be professional and sometimes (a lot) the public take frustrations out on them. They don't deserve that, they need better support.

Have been an Emergency nurse for 26 years. Patients have to be the greatest priority in all Australian Emergency Departments. 3:1 ratio is still often a great strain when dealing with increasing health problems, complex patients often with multiple co-morbidities, increasing violence and aggression. Let's put our patients and holistic care first and foremost.

4 to 1 ratio should mean registered nurses. The ward is extremely busy with many sick patients, we are constantly under pressure. Because of the need for beds many patients are discharged before they are well enough. As a result there is an increase in failed discharges - leaving one day and back within 7 days. Waste of resources and time, because of the push for beds.

It is absolutely critical that the nurse ratio continues. Pts condition can change extremely quickly and attention must be made to monitor the pt continuously. This cannot be done when the ratios are too high. Pts will die and nurses will leave feeling burnt out and exhausted. Please do not do this to our health system. Save our patients and save our nurses!

I work at Armidale hospital where we team nurse 2 nurses to 12 patients.  Teams consist of either an RN and EN or RN and AIN. We also have new grads and students. The medical ward also incorporates palliative care beds, a stroke unit and rehab beds. It is high level care and high acuity. Often staffing is not ideal and doesn’t match the workload. I think each and every nurse here is exhausted.  You just need to look at the rate staff leave and you will see something is not right. The ward also has no air conditioning making it unbearably hot. This is unhealthy for staff and patients alike. We have fans lined up in the hallways to try and cool it. This is another matter as I find it dangerous especially with patients who don't mobilise well it is a real hazard. If anyone reads follow-up phone calls you will see patients saying we need more staff. It's 2015, we should all be working safely and dare I say happily rather than exhausted, tired and short tempered. Thank you.

Have been an Emergency nurse for 26 years. Patients have to be the greatest priority in all Australian Emergency Departments. 3:1 ratio is still often a great strain when dealing with increasing health problems, complex patients often with multiple co-morbidities, increasing violence and aggression. Let's put our patients and holistic care first and foremost.

Absolutely we need to support nurses. They are at the coal face especially in ED and intensive care. They have to deal with a swathe of human tragedy and be professional, and sometimes (a lot) the public take frustrations out on them. They don't deserve that, they need better support.

It ridiculous to expect nurses in ED to give adequate care to more than 3 patients considering the turnover of patients let alone the acuity, behavioural aspects.

Nurses are copping the blame for waiting time in emergency rooms when clearly they are here to help. The government clearly needs to understand that you need to help others before you help yourself.

Nurse patient ratios are what help determine, safe care for patients, or often unsafe care. Good nurse patient ratios, mean well supported staff, who are more likely to be happy to come to work, and less likely to use sick leave due to stress. Better outcomes occur if nurses don't have to care for too many patients

More nurses mean more care. It is easy to feel alone and ignored in a hospital. If there are more nurses if an emergency arises there are still hands free to maintain care of other patients before they decline or suffer an extra half hour or more of pain because their next analgesic dose is delayed.

Emergency by definition is a serious, unexpected, and often dangerous situation requiring immediate action. This can also include 'the emergency situation overwhelming resources at hand. Emergency departments nationwide are highly dynamic and ever changing environments. Regardless of how many staff are 'employed' (casual/part-time/full-timers) in any given week the number on shift always struggle. This is not from lack of knowledge but lack of realistic staffing support. The potential for 'overwhelming situations' arising on any given shift is growing far too rapidly. Most emergency departments have more 'arrivals' than are medically manageable. When will see 'cause of death' listed as 'accidental negligence due to lack of staff.

The key to better health care is better nurse to patient ratios. Hopefully many voices can bring this change about.

I have been in emergency quite a lot and know the nurses need more help! They do a fantastic job!

This is my experience working in a busy Sydney public hospital emergency department. More often than not there would be 1 registered nurse to 8 Acute care patients. This occurred because the other registered nurse allocated to work in that area would be needed in the resus bays for extended periods looking after patients and an enrolled nurse would be transferring patients to ward beds across the hospital. This would leave the one nurse to care for patients ranging from chest pains, confused stroke / elderly, children, drug and alcohol scheduled and physical restrained patients plus everything else inbetween. Unsafe!  Now I work as an registered nurse in a private country hospital and often we can have 2 registered nurses to cover our rehab, medical, surgical wards and high dependency unit. We do not have onsite medical cover after hours so the Registered nurse also covers an in-charge hospital role and is responsible to escalate appropriate care and arrange for transfers out of any deteriorating/unstable patients. This is also whilst having a patient load which is up to 8 patients on an afternoon shift.  Nurse to patient ratios with appropriate skill mix across all shifts is essential to safe patient care, I believe ratios are important regardless of what area you work in. It reduces errors and improved patient outcomes. Safety must be the number one priority, and appropriate nurse:patient ratios are a big piece of this!

It is absolutely critical that the nurse’s ratio of 3:1 continues. Patients condition can change extremely quickly and attention must be made to monitor the pt continuously. This cannot be done when the ratios are too high. Pts will die and nurses will leave feeling burnt out and exhausted. Please do not do this to our health system. Save our patients and save our nurses!

The key to better health care is better nurse to patient ratios. Hopefully many voices can bring this change about.

Emergency by definition is a serious, unexpected and often dangerous situation requiring immediate action. This can also include 'the emergency situation overwhelming resources at hand'.

Emergency departments nationwide are highly dynamic and ever changing environments. Regardless of how many staff are employed (casual/part-time/full-timers) in any given week, the number on shift always struggle. This is not from lack of knowledge but lack of realistic staffing support. The potential for 'overwhelming situations' arising on any given shift is growing far too rapidly. Most emergency departments have more arrivals than are medically manageable. When will we see 'cause of death' listed as 'accidental negligence due to lack of staff'?

More nurses means more care. It is easy to feel alone and ignored in a hospital. If there are more nurses, if an emergency arises there are still hands free to maintain care of other patients before they decline or suffer an extra half hour or more of pain because their next analgesic dose is delayed.

Nurse-patient ratios are what help determine safe care for patients - or often unsafe care. Good nurse-patient ratios mean well-supported staff who are more likely to be happy to come to work and less likely to use sick leave due to stress. Better outcomes occur if nurses don't have to care for too many patients.

This is my experience working in a busy Sydney public hospital emergency department. More often than not there would be 1 registered nurse to 8 acute care patients. This occurred because the other registered nurse allocated to work in that area would be needed in the resus bays for extended periods looking after patients and an enrolled nurse would be transferring patients to ward beds across the hospital. This would leave the one nurse to care for patients ranging from chest pain, confused stroke /elderly, children, drug and alcohol scheduled and physically-restrained patients plus everything else in between. Unsafe!

Now I work as an registered nurse in a private country hospital and often we can have 2 registered nurses to cover our rehab, medical, surgical wards and high dependency unit. We do not have onsite medical cover after hours so the registered nurse also covers an in-charge hospital role and is responsible to escalate appropriate care and arrange for transfers out of any deteriorating/unstable patients. This is also while having a patient load which is up to 8 patients on an afternoon shift. 

Nurse to patient ratios with appropriate skill mix across all shifts is essential to safe patient care. I believe ratios are important regardless of what area you work in. It reduces errors and improved patient outcomes. Safety must be the number one priority and appropriate nurse:patient ratios are a big piece of this!